The Program Committee invites submissions for the twenty-sixth annual meeting of the International Society for Research on Identity (ISRI). The conference will be held in Naples, Italy, from Monday May 13th to Wednesday May 15th, 2019. Membership in ISRI is not required to submit a presentation for consideration or to attend the conference. ISRI is an interdisciplinary organization and strongly encourages submissions from a diversity of fields such as psychology, sociology, family studies, and anthropology.


Proposal Submission Overview

This year, you can choose from the following submission formats: interactive sessions, paper symposia, individual paper presentations (2 types!), poster presentations (2 types!) and a new grant competition for early-career researchers. Please note that we have several new options this year! Please see http://identityisri.org/call-for-papers/ for information about each submission type. 


Material may only be submitted for one format (e.g., the same material may not be submitted as a poster and also as a paper). Read the directions carefully and pay close attention to the instructions while you are preparing your proposal(s). Improperly prepared proposals will NOT be reviewed. If you have questions, please contact the program committee chair, Sara K. Johnson, s.johnson@tufts.edu.


Submission Process Timeline

Monday, October 1st, 2018: The submission portal will open.

Friday, November 16th, 2018: Submission deadline for expedited review. Expedited review is available for all formats EXCEPT the grant competition. Please note that submissions must be in the required format to be reviewed. 

Friday, December 14th, 2018: Notifications regarding expedited review proposals will be sent. 

Friday, December 14th, 2018: Submission deadline for regular review proposals and proposals for the grant competition. Please note that submissions must be in the required format to be reviewed. 

Friday, January 18th, 2019: Notifications regarding regular review proposals and proposals for the grant competition will be sent. 

Late proposals that are received after December 14th, 2018 but prior to February 1, 2019, may still be reviewed, subject to space availabilty. 

Ends in 5 days, 6 hours

Interactive sessions are designed to encourage exchange of ideas, methods, and/or experiences focused on a particular topic, to encourage contact among people who may benefit from shared ideas. Although some mention of research results and conclusions may be necessary, the primary focus should be on getting people involved in discussion of ongoing issues, controversies, projects, etc. Interactive sessions might include roundtable discussions, conversation hours, small group work, etc. Submissions focusing primarily on someone’s research agenda and data analysis should be submitted as one of the other presentation formats. Interactive sessions will be scheduled for either 50 or 80 minutes.

Components: 

  1. Title
  2. Author information (Names, Institutional Affiliations, e-mail addresses)
  3. Time preference (50 or 80 minutes)
  4. 100-word maximum short abstract, to be included in the conference program.
  5. 500-word maximum long abstract, used for review purposes. It should include the title of the session, a brief outline of what will be discussed, how discussion will be promoted, and brief information about the expertise of presenters relative to the topic. However, do not include author names in this document.  

New this year! 

  

Have a question about your identity-related research that you would like to hear other people’s opinions about? You can submit an “Ask-A-Question” poster. These posters involve an overview of an identity-related research situation leading to an unanswered theoretical or methodological question. Poster session attendees will engage presenters in discussion about these questions and provide advice about potential solutions.  

Potential question formats: 

· What are the alternatives to [X] for analyzing data about [Y]? 

· How can I ask parents about their children’s identity development? 

· Should I use X measure, Y measure, or a different identity measure? 

The poster submission must include a description of the research situation leading to the question as well as potential options that the presenter is considering. The questions should not have a single, simple answer, but instead they should prompt numerous potential answers that can be compared.

Components

  1. Title (Phrased as a Question)
  2. Author information 
  3. 100-word maximum brief abstract, to be included in the conference program
  4. 500-word maximum long abstract, without author information, for review purposes, with up to 2 figures/tables (excluded from the word count).

Traditional posters include submissions focusing on empirical results or theoretical and pedagogical topics related to identity. All methods appropriate to the discipline, the data, and the issue under study are acceptable (including small sample, single subject, and descriptive designs). For empirical submissions, preference will be given to submissions with completed data analysis (due to space limitations), but submissions should summarize data already collected and must include sufficient report of data analysis for reviewer evaluation. 

Components

Title

Author information 

100-word maximum brief abstract, to be included in the conference program

500-word maximum long abstract, without author information, for review purposes, with up to 2 figures/tables (excluded from the word count). 

New This Year!

Would you like to get more feedback about… a research project you are planning? Items you are trying to design? Data you are trying to analyze? You can submit a Works-in-Progress Paper Presentation. In this format, the presenter gives   background information about the topic and specifics about the project, just   as in a traditional paper presentation. Then, however, the presenter gives at   least two questions for the audience on which they would like feedback or to have a discussion. Submissions should describe the context of the situation   and list at least two questions. 

Works-in-Progress Papers may be organized into small sessions (2 or 3 papers) with similar questions or themes. Each session may be chaired by people with expertise on the topics of the papers who will also provide feedback. We welcome presenters from all settings   (e.g., youth-serving organizations, university positions) and all career levels to help us try out a new presentation format!

Components

  1. Title
  2. Author information
  3. 100-word maximum short abstract, for the conference program
  4. 500-word maximum long abstract, without author information, for review purposes, with up to 2 tables/figures (excluded from the word count).

Traditional posters include submissions focusing on empirical results or theoretical and pedagogical topics related to identity. All methods appropriate to the discipline, the data, and the issue under study are acceptable (including small sample, single subject, and descriptive designs). For empirical submissions, preference will be given to submissions with completed data analysis (due to space limitations), but submissions should summarize data already collected and must include sufficient report of data analysis for reviewer evaluation. 

Components

  1. Title
  2. Author information 
  3. 100-word maximum brief abstract, to be included in the conference program
  4. 500-word maximum long abstract, without author information, for review purposes, with up to 2 figures/tables (which are excluded from the word count)

New This Year!

Early career researchers are invited to submit their ideas for a chance to participate in a grant competition to take place at the 2019 ISRI conference. 

If you are a student or are within five years of receiving your PhD, you can submit a proposal for a research project that you would conduct with a $1,000 grant. Author teams can include up to 3 authors, but all must be early-career researchers and each person can only be an author on one proposal for the grant competition (but may submit proposals of other types). 

Proposals will be reviewed by the Program Committee and ISRI Board. Review criteria include 1. the scientific quality of the project (including that it is clearly about some aspect of identity, broadly defined), 2. whether the project is feasible with $1,000, and 3. the creativity of the research. The authors of the 3 highest-rated proposals will be invited to present in a special session during the conference.

At the conference, these three authors will each give a 5-7-minute presentation about their proposal to a panel of judges and the audience. After each presentation, there will be a 15-minute question period in which both the judges and members of the audience may ask questions, and the presenters may respond. Following all three presentations, the judges will rank the proposals, and the audience members will vote on which proposal should be funded. The grant recipient will be determined by 50% judges’ ranking and 50% audience choice. 

Components: 

  1. Title
  2. Author information (up to three authors, all must be early-career researchers)
  3. 100-word maximum short abstract, for the conference program
  4. 500-word maximum long abstract, without author information, for review purposes. Long abstracts should describe why the study is needed, what research questions the project will address, what activities will be done for the project, and a brief description of how the grant funds would be spent. 
Ends in 5 days, 6 hours

A paper symposium should include three paper presentations with a chair and a discussant (please note that this year there is no option for four papers without a discussant). The symposium should focus on a specific topic and emphasize conceptual issues and the integration of findings. It is the chair’s responsibility to include presenters whose work fits cohesively into the overarching theme of the symposium, and a discussant who will tie these presentations together. The chair will also be responsible for introducing presenters and holding presenters to their allotted time within the symposium. The role of a discussant is to comment on the papers included in the symposium, drawing on their own expertise. Symposia will be scheduled for 1 hour and 30 minutes. At least 15 minutes should be allowed for discussion with the audience as part of the symposium.

Components: One person must enter all information for an entire symposium. 

  1. Title
  2. Author information for the symposium chair, discussant, and all authors (including names, institutional affiliations, and emails).
  3. A 200-word maximum integrative statement and 100-word maximum abstracts for each paper in the symposium (to be included in the conference program). 
  4. A 500-word maximum integrative statement and 500-word maximum abstracts for each presentation in the symposium, without author information, for review purposes. 
ISRI 2019 Conference